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Holiday Stocking Stuffer Wish List

1 Clif Bar Seasonal

I’m a cyclist, I ride year round and there are key things that I use year round, or around this time of year lust after. For all of you looking to buy something for a cyclist in your life this is my stocking stuffer list. I’ll also be writing up a larger item Holiday Wish List for the bigger ticket items.

Camelbak Podium Chill Bottle

Camelbak Podium Chill Bottle

Insulated, easy to use mouth piece and a close off valve to keep the bottle from leaking in your bag or on a shaky mountain ride.

Rear Blinky Light

Walk in to any bike shop and for $10 – 40 you can get a good rear light. Depending what type of traffic and weather your cyclist rides in you may want to spend more.

Cycling SocksDeFeet Socks

I’m a sucker for wool but maybe your cyclist is into pastel colors, crazy designs or an easy “STFU” on their cuff. Another easy to find stocking stuffer.

Tubes

Tubes for your bike is a much needed evil for when you get a flat on the side of the road. Take a look on the side of the tires of your cyclist bike, right down the sizes and note if the valve of the tire looks like a car or a skinny presta valve. (If you explain it at all to a shop they’ll understand.) Often during the holidays shops will have buy 5 for the price of 4 or something.

Clif Bar SeasonalHoliday Clif Bars

During the holidays Clif puts out limited runs of their bars in Gingerbread, Pumpkin and Peppermint. Local grocery stores and bike shops should have these in stock.

Motivational Monday with Tianna Meilinger

2 Motivational Monday Tianna Meilinger

Motivational Monday Tianna Meilinger

What’s your name and location?

Tianna Meilinger of Vaya Bags Ridgewood, NY

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

I like going to different bike trails such as Caumsett Park in Long Island. I also love running errands in NYC on my bike. Its really the best way to get around the city. I also commute to and from work at Vaya Bags, where I handmake bike messenger bags.

What is your first cycling memory?

I used to go camping in the Florida Keys with my parents every winter and my first memories of riding were there, on the Behia Honda campsite.

Who inspires you to ride, and better yet WHY?

My good friend Rachel who is a bike messenger in New York City is very inspiring to me. When I get out on my bike in the rain, I think of Rachel hauling ass in the rain, snow, and sleet all winter long.

What has been your best moment on the bike so far this year?

My husband and I rented bikes while on vacation in Lake Tahoe. It was pretty awesome riding around, seeing the beautiful scenery and smelling the fresh mountain air.

Tell us all about your bikes

I have a 1969 Vintage Holdsworth, that I found at a garage sale for six bucks and I love it!
I also have a Specialized Crossroads Hybrid which I use on trails.

Motivational Monday, a Monday tradition at Bike Shop Girl, my goal to keep you motivated and to be striving on the bike even during a hard week or long hours at work. Are you a woman that bicycles? Fill out this easy form and be part of our motivational movement!

Dear Bike Industry, Please Find Your Morals

9 sscxwc1

I was asked to remove the original photo and name of the woman in the below story by the woman. She doesn’t want to continue to be apart of the fight to make cycling a better place for women.

Last Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving, I was awoken with the sounding of bells, chats and emails. You see a friend saw a female cyclist in need, knowing I would take up arms and fight the good fight he sought me out at o’dark:30 Seattle time. It would take a bystander woman to get things moving in the right direction.

A few years ago a woman was cheering on the sidelines of SSCXWC in her bikini. Well aware there were photographs taken, and shared. Let’s be honest…if I had a body like that, I would be on the sidelines in a bikini too. Fast forward to last Wednesday, the eve of Thanksgiving. Road Bike Review decided to make a caption contest out of this photo. Moving forward they did not MODERATE the comments, and when the subject of the photograph emailed and added her own comment – it was ignored/deleted.

I don’t need to remind you, I don’t mind scantily clad cycling women. Neither does the subject of the photograph. What I do mind is having a photo being used as a caption contest, with no moderation. Road Bike Review, this is how you want to draw in women to read your site? Let’s allow vulgar comments that border libel actions.

Learn more from the original email to OBRA after the young woman tried to reach out to Road Bike Review multiple times.

Earlier this morning (after being beat up on) the Facebook photo and “caption contest” was removed. I hope the bicycle industry media and marketing geniuses learn something from this. We live in a progressive world but do we need to make it any worse?

Photo credit: creativextreme.com

Motivational Monday with Sue Carr

0 Sue Carr Motivational Monday

Motivational Monday, a Monday tradition at Bike Shop Girl, my goal to keep you motivated and to be striving on the bike even during a hard week or long hours at work. Are you a woman that bicycles? Fill out this easy form and be part of our motivational movement!

I’ve known Sue and her husband for a few years now. It has been very exciting to see her grow and push her comfort zone in cycling. Now as an avid time trialist on a Cervelo S1 that I had the fortune of assisting her purchase and original fitting now two years ago. You’ll find Sue and her husband at the local time trial series at the local NASCAR speedway, traveling to regional rides as well and even competing in the National Senior Games cycling time trial!

What’s your name and location?

Sue at Charlotte, NC

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

Road (and time trials)

What is your first cycling memory?

Riding my little red tricycle down the very small hill in the driveway and having to push it back up the hill so I could ride down again.

Who inspires you to ride, and better yet WHY?

No one in particular. Ride because I feel so much better on the bike (after I have warmed up) and after the ride–do it for the uplift.

What has been your best moment on the bike so far this year?

Riding the Blue Ridge looking at the foliage and not even worrying about the hills

Tell us all about your bikes

Only one bike I ride much at all, a Cervelo. Have a beater Trek that is saved for “just in case,” and an old hardtail mountain bike that very rarely gets out of the garage

Review: Burley D’Lite Child Trailer

4 Burley D'Lite Child Trailer

I’ll keep you from reading my rant of why I feel that child bike seats are unsafe and can lead to danger for the child and adult. That will be saved for another day.

Earlier in the summer Burley sent out a D’Lite Child Trailer for review purposes. Walking into the review I knew from my experience in the past with Burley, their trailers and the quality they take around design and development – I would be pleased with the results of their D’Lite trailer. As my children are grown to 10 and 11 years old, I borrowed and stole children of all sizes for the review and testing. At the bottom of this is a ton of photos to hopefully document all the details that the D’Lite has to offer.

Burley D'Lite Child Trailer

My Burley Trailer History

My first experience with Burley outside of selling them was back in 2005. The shop I was managing outside of Boston had a few rental Burley trailers to use on the local rail to trail. During the early spring before our rental period picked up I adopted a puppy. I used a kids trailer with a couple blankets and a short leash to transport my new puppy to the shop and back. She loved it, I loved it and it was perfect. Since then Burley has actually released the Tail Wagon which is a trailer designed for your dog!

My next experience with Burley was as a bike line. My small shop in Charlotte, NC stocked and sold their road line. Beautiful steel bikes, a dying breed. Since then Burley has restructured and really going after the trailer and pull behind niche.

My latest experience was with the Burley Travoy. An urban trailer I reviewed over at Commute By Bike. The review is also reposted on Bike Shop Girl with more photos.

Details of the Burley D’Lite Child Trailer

Burley D'Lite Child Trailer

Rear Window Unzipped

Details pulled right from Burley.com

  • Available in Green or Orange
  • Replacement covers available in Yellow, Blue or Red
  • Bowed-out sides for increased interior width/shoulder room
  • Elastomer suspension system
  • Exclusive height-adjustable handlebar that doubles as roll bar
  • All weather cover with waterproof zippers
  • Deluxe reclining padded seats
  • Five-point harness and padded shoulder harness
  • Removable, washable seat pad and shoulder harness
  • Tinted side windows
  • Adjustable sunshade
  • Parking brake

D’Lite Specifications

Number of children 2
Capacity 100.0 lb/ 45.4 kg
Weight 28.0 lb/ 12.7 kg
Interior height 25.2 in/ 64.0 cm
Interior width 26.4 in/ 67.1 cm
Interior seat width 20.0 in/ 50.8 cm
Cargo space 35.0 liters
Wheel size 20.0 in/ 50.8 cm

Burley D'Lite Child Trailer

Key Features

The things I found unique and completely Burley:

  • Tinted side windows
  • Rear window that zips down for airflow and the child can see around
  • Drink and snack holders on both sides the seats
  • Reflective piping and logos all around the shell
  • Easy to use
  • Push button wheels
  • Standard 20″ wheels, not the plastic kind
  • Did I mention easy to use?
  • Adaptable to all types of bikes

My Overall Feelings

The D’Lite delivered as I expected it to. The trailer isn’t the cheapest out there, but if you purchase an accessory kit this could become your do all stroller, running jogger and kid hauler. The ability to completely flatten, pull the wheels off and stow it in the back of your vehicle is irreplaceable for the family on the go. Why not have one killer trailer/stroller/hauler instead of 3 that do 3 different things?

In the end I do believe that trailers are safer, allow you to bring two kids, clothing, and they are tucked behind UV windows, rain fly’s mesh, and a roll bar. 5 point harness system will keep every kid in place. Extra room allows you to put snacks and toys in with them, without the ability of them throwing it overboard.

I hope to explore how parents can get their children interested in riding in the trailer, how to do it safely and tips/ideas of how to get out with your family. In the end it is completely how the parent handles taking the their child, how they encourage healthy living and being outside.

 

Disclaimer: This product was provided at no charge. I was not paid or bribed for the review and was completely as judgmental as I am with everything else in my life.

Motivational Monday with Colleen Schaible

0 Motivational Monday

Motivational Monday, a Monday tradition at Bike Shop Girl, my goal to keep you motivated and to be striving on the bike even during a hard week or long hours at work. Are you a woman that bicycles? Fill out this easy form and be part of our motivational movement!

What’s your name and location?

Colleen Schaible, Farmington NY

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

Road cycling

What is your first cycling memory?

My first pink Barbie bike and the day my dad took the training wheels off…I was wearing a pink windbreaker and it was fall and there were beautiful leaves on the gound! He took the training wheels off and away I went! I didn’t look back until I hit college and then upon turning 30 I was reaquainted with a bike and a new type of riding, now I will never look back!

Who inspires you to ride, and better yet WHY?

My husband inspires me to ride and inspires me to be my best! He was the person to re-introduce me to the joy that is riding a bike and then showed me the courage to take my riding to the next level.

What has been your best moment on the bike so far this year?

I think my best moment was a local ride called the Tour de Thompson here in Brisotl, NY when I first met a group of local riders from a team I am now a member of…the ride was 63 miles and about 6000 feet of climbing over some tough grades! I put the boys in the hurt locker that day :) it was a great feeling that I try to tap in to time and time again on the road!

Tell us all about your bikes

My favorite bike is my Specialized S Works Ruby road bike with amazing Zipp 303 wheels! It is black and white with a bit of red! My new toy is a Specialized Transition time trial bike that I hope to shred some time trial fields with next year. It is red and white with a bit of blk! I also have a Specialized Tri Cross that I bought to ride in the winter weather here in UNY. As you can see, I am a huge fan of Specialized!!!

Full Review: 2012 Raleigh RX 1.0 Women’s Cyclocross Bike

23 2012 Raleigh RX1 Cyclocross Bike

For the past month I have been cruising around on the 2012 Raleigh RX 1.0 Women’s cyclocross bike. A good amount of people emailed and tweeted about the bike, so there must be an interest in women’s cyclocross! You can read the preview over yonder.

Continue reading →

Review: 2012 Trek Lush Women’s Full Suspension Mountain Bike

16 2012 Trek Lush Carbon

Since posting the first photos back in July the 2012 Trek Lush has been a buzz around Bike Shop Girl. The Twitter stream gets many comments, Facebook gets many questions and my email has its own little folder of women waiting to hear more on first test rides and availability. As I mentioned a few weeks back I was fortunate enough to be loaned a 2012 Trek Lush Carbon for review and demo purposes from the East Coast Women’s Trek Demo rep.

Continue reading →

The Ultimate Century Nutrition Plan

2 Fuel Factor

Our guest article today is from, Kimberly Mueller, MS, RD, CSSD, the founder and owner of Fuel Factor Nutrition, is a Registered Dietitian, Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, and competitive athlete who provides custom meal planning, nutrition coaching, and event-nutrition guidance to athletes worldwide.  More information on Fuel Factor services can be found at www.Fuel-Factor.com.  Kim can be reached at kim@Fuel-Factor.com

 

Kimberly Mueller

Whether you are professional cyclist pushing some serious wattage to win a race or a cycle-newbie excited to explore the countryside, implementation of a sound nutrition plan will be a huge determining factor in how your body will respond to the century challenge. Fueling peak cycling performance involves a trio of steps including: 1) tapered training and carbohydrate loading the 2 weeks leading up to the ride, 2) eating a meal the morning of the ride, and 3) consuming foods and fluids during the ride itself. Here’s a nutritional countdown to help your century preparation:

Two weeks and counting….

Many athletes actually dread the taper leading up to a big event, such as a century ride, but from a nutritional standpoint, when you complete your peak training volume about 2 weeks out from race day, muscle glycogen (carbohydrate) stores are about 30% lower than capacity, not an ideal place to be at for peak performance. Therefore, a two-week taper is appropriate before a century ride as means to allow your muscles to nutritionally reload.

In the first week of your taper, training volume should be reduced by 40% with the cutback being reflected on all your normal weekly rides. On race week, not only will training volume be reduced by another 40% but carbohydrate concentration in your diet should increase approximately 25% representing about 80% of your total caloric intake. However, while increases in carbohydrate are necessary, this is not an invite to blindly pile on the pasta till your pant button explodes. Calorie intake needs to match output so if you find yourself gaining more than 2% of your pre-load weight, you are consuming too much. Most athletes require ~15 calories per pound of body mass to support basic metabolic needs and tapered daily activities.

One day and counting…

While you may be eager to explore the pre-race scene, it is important that you maintain a ‘taper focus’, keeping your activity and time on foot to a minimal the day prior to a century. Make sure to stay hydrated, sipping on fluids until your urine maintains a pale yellow appearance. Continue your carbohydrate-focus but keep your diet low residue, meaning fiber content should be reduced a bit in favor of ‘easier-to-digest’ options (e.g., banana instead of an apple; white pasta over whole wheat pasta). In addition, fat and protein at your evening meal should be kept minimal as these nutrients take longer to clear the gut and can cause nausea on race morning, especially if the meal is eaten after 6pm. Make sure to stick with familiar foods, saving the more exotic local cuisine for post-ride.

Ride morning….

While a training taper and coordinated increase in carbohydrate intake is proven to prime your muscles for peak cycling performance, a carbohydrate-focused meal on ride morning will help restock your depleted liver glycogen stores, ultimately giving you that mental boost to perform at peak during the initial stages of the century ride. Our liver has the capacity to store approximately 100 grams (400 calories) of carbohydrate making this the target for consumption in the 2 hours leading up to race start. Much like your carbo-loading regimen, limit dietary fiber intake and instead use up to 25 grams of protein (e.g., egg, yogurt, soy milk) to help stabilize energy levels. Small amounts of fat (up to 20 grams), like that found in a couple tablespoons of peanut butter, can provide additional satiation value. Finally, aim at drinking ½-1 liter of fluid or enough that your urine runs pale yellow in the hours leading up to event start. For those vulnerable to cramping or premature muscle fatigue, consuming up to a gram of salt as part of your pre-ride fuel, whether found naturally in your food or added like that in a sports drink, has been shown to help mute the onset by a good 20% during endurance events such as a century ride.

Meals on Wheels

Meals on WheelsAll the nutritional work during your taper and carbo-loading regimen and pre-ride meal is not enough to carry you through a century ride making ‘meals on wheels’ essential for protection against the mental ‘bonk’ and muscle wrenching ‘wall’. Because both pedaling and digestion of food require oxygen nourishment, it is impossible to replace 100% of cycling output, which falls at 500-1000 calories/hour for most endurance cyclists, but, while a 30-40% replacement rate is optimal for most, the goal is to test that limit as means to mute the fatigue seen with depleted glycogen stores.

Note that with increases wattage, effort, and/or heart rate, there will be increases in calorie output yet the ability to absorb nutrients will decrease making the onset of muscle fatigue more probable. Therefore, cyclists who are racing a century should focus primarily on easier-to-absorb liquid carbohydrates (e.g, sport drink, gels with water), utilizing multiple carbohydrate sources (e.g., maltodextrin + 1-2 simple sugars) to help improve rate of uptake and accommodate their higher calorie outputs. All cyclists should avoid piling on the calories at sag stations as this will only divert blood/oxygen/water to the belly increasing the likelihood of cramping and/or nausea post-feeding. Ultimately, experimentation with different products during training is key to help create a plan that will work best for you on event day.

Want help creating an ultimate cycling nutrition plan? Kimberly Mueller, MS, RD, CSSD founder and owner of Fuel Factor Nutrition, is a Registered Dietitian, Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, and competitive athlete who provides custom meal planning, nutrition coaching, and event-nutrition guidance to athletes worldwide. More information on Fuel Factor services can be found at www.Fuel-Factor.com. Kim can be reached at kim@Fuel-Factor.com .