Search Results for: "light"

Lake Norman Bicycle Route
0

Lake Norman Bike Route Ribbon Cutting This Weekend

If you are a local to me (Charlotte/Lake Norman, NC) then you should know about the dedication event of the Lake Norman Bicycle Route. The route is planned to circle Lake Norman on marked roads, greenways, and showing points of interest. The route is 3/4 of the way marked and mapped! Read more about it or view the map here. 

Lake Norman Bicycle Route

This Saturday is the event to kick things off, including a bike ride!

Saturday, October 15, 2011 at the Troutman Depot 
137 South Main Street, Troutman, NC 
Starts at 10am

Description of the Troutman Loop to be ridden after the ceremony Saturday

Begin at Downtown Troutman’s landmark Old Depot at US 21/NC 115 (Main St.) and Wagner Rd.  Careful crossing US 21 to start your ride south on Wagner.  After 1.5 miles, veer right onto State Park Rd.  The scenery becomes more rural and wooded approaching Lake Norman State Park.   Past the first bridge, see a parking area at Park Lake.  Boats can be rented here during summer.  The building provides restrooms and drinking fountain (mid-March to November).  A Porta-John is located at the north entrance of the parking lot by the Itusi Mountain Bike Trail entrance.  A mile further on State Park Rd., turn right after the Park’s west gate.  St. John’s Rd. ends at E. Monbo Rd.  Turn right, and in a ¼-mile, veer right to stay on E. Monbo and the Loop.  E. Monbo stretches another 4 miles through hilly, rural horse country before reaching Old Mountain Rd.  (To visit Daveste’ Vineyards, divert right onto Talley St., past Hicks Creek Rd., and another right onto Lytton Farm.) Continue to Troutman, turning right on Old Mountain Rd. to reach US 21/NC 115.  At the light, turn right.  After a ¼ mile, turn left at Old Murdock, then right onto Eastway.  Notice the “Richardson Greenway” path across from Town Hall.  In ¾-mile return to the Depot.  If you’re hungry, enjoy one of the several restaurants you just passed along Main St.

Aspercreme
0

North Meck CX #2 Race Report

This past week was my first real cyclocross race of the season. There I said it. With all of the last minute traveling, work and now working on landing a new job I simply have not put as much effort as I thought I would in to cyclocross this fall.

The race was at North Meck Park in Huntersville, NC. What is super unique about this race series (other than it is on Tuesdays) is that it is at night, the first race starting at 6pm. The way it works is the course wraps around 4 different baseball and softball fields, utilizing the lights of the fields to light up the area outside of the fence. Up and down the hills, between the fields, some run ups, some barriers and always good fun but never on the ball fields!

I lined up this week with the boys. There were no girls to play with. Very sad since I know several women that would rack the season but they never show up to ride around in circles with me for 30 minutes.

While I pushed myself harder than I thought I could, I made some ride ups I didn’t think I would make and in the end I beat a few guys, barely being passed by two younger guys right before the finish.

Success is what I call it. If I race a couple more of these before the holidays, I’ll be very happy! Aspercreme was very needed after the ride…

Niner Low Top 9 Handlebar
0

Niner Goes Big with new Low Top 9 Handlebar

As someone that rides a 29er exclusively I run into the issue of getting front end lower, and I’m 5’10 with this issue! This new goofy looking handlebar from Niner will allow my front end to be lower for better stability and bike fit.

 

Niner Low Top 9 Handlebar

 

Low Top RDO Handlebar

MSRP: $199
Sizing: 720mm width, 25mm drop with 17º sweep
Weight: 258g
Details: Available in Niner red, orange, green, ralley blue and moondust grey

Handlebar height is critical to efficiency and comfort. Until now, small riders have had to choose between the advantages of longer travel forks and big wheels vs. achieving an optimal XC position.

Niner has inside information when it comes to fitting smaller riders on 29ers – our President and Marketing Manager both fit in this category. Chris and Carla are the first ones to speak up and make sure we address the needs of of riders at every height. We’ve added size extra small frames to Niner’s line up and now we take it one step further to help you get the best fit. Our new Low Top RDO handlebar has all the features of Niner’s RDO line up – it’s light, strong and is covered by our C5 Carbon warranty, but an inch lower.

Who is the Low Top RDO Designed For?

Any rider who wants to get low. Great for every size XC and Endurance racer.
Any rider who is fit-challenged by longer fork travel or bigger wheels.
Riders with short stems that want a lower bar.
Riders who prefer the wrist position offered by a 17º sweep.

Learn more on NinerBikes.com

 

Fulcrum Racing Zero
0

Wheel Lust and Love

Wheels are one of those romantic parts of cycling to me. Something that can make your bike 100% better, or 200% worse. Truing wheels is the first memory I have of working in a bike shop 12 years ago. It was the first “bike mechanic” skill really taught to me. Before that it was installing kick stands and cleaning off bikes.

Wheel systems like Fulcrum, Mavic and Industry9 hold a spot in my mind, strong, reliable and a thought out system. If those hold a spot in my mind, hand built wheels with your standard j-bend spoke hold a place in my heart.

There is some feeling inside of you when you pick out the perfect hub, the right rim, spoke lacing pattern to make it stiff and strong while light weight, and final touches such as the nipples that hold it all together.

Campagnola Track Hub

I’ve always been drawn to things like Phil Wood hubs, Campagnola C-Record Sheriff Badge hubs and reliable rims like Mavic Open Pro. Then someone goes and post something like this, Enve rims laced to Chris King road hubs and I am left searching the internet planning my next wheel build.

Motivational Monday Melinda
0

Motivational Monday with Miranda

What’s your name and location?

Miranda from Dallas, y’all

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

Relaxed rides on trails and around lakes, commuter biking, road biking.

What is your first cycling memory?

Oh my goodness, this is an intense one. I remember riding around the church parking lot across from my house. My papa was watching my sisters and me and I wanted to show off my sweet moves for him. As I peddled around in dizzying circles, I lost control and fell hands first into the gravel. Since Papa was already old (he was my great grandfather), it took him a bit to come over. By the time he arrived, the blood had already congealed and covered up the piece of rock buried in my hand. Papa had only one choice. As he took out his pocket knife to clean it, my four year old self screamed bloody murder. My sisters held me down while Papa used the knife to cut the rock out of my hand and the hanging skin around it. I made it home where my mom bandaged it up. Definitely not a memory I easily forgot!

Who inspires you to ride, and better yet WHY?

I don’t know exactly who inspires me. I ride because it is a time to be by myself, to think, to experience the world, to spend time with God if you will. Yes, I love to ride with my friends, but biking has usually been about getting rid of stress or finding peace in the crazy days.

What has been your best moment on the bike so far this year?

Probably while I was in a small village called Santinetikan in India. There were no cars, so everyone got around by bike, foot, or motorcycle. We were able to rent out these (terrible) vintage, slightly rusted cruisers to get around. As the sun was setting and the rice workers were coming in, the twilight called all the lightning bugs out to play. I remember looking up at the dusky sky, surrounded by jungle and fireflies and all I could think of (which is cheesy I know) is that I am experiencing something magical. I wish everyone could experience that moment, stopping by the holy river, watching the villagers go about their life without knowing how special (even if poverty stricken) it is. In that moment I easily could have left everything here in the states for that rusty bicycle in that old village in the jungle.

Tell us all about your bikes

I have had many bikes over the years. My favorite, a light purple vintage Schwinn road bike with original gears named Fernando, was stolen a couple of years ago. Right now I am riding a cherry red vintage Takara that makes all the bikers in Dallas jealous for some reason. This bike is named Fabregas (I name my bikes after Barcelona futbol players) and was custom rebuilt for me by an after school program in Dallas called Mercy Street. It is awesome to still be able to go out to west Dallas and ride the levees with the kids that built this bike for me.

Motivational Monday, a Monday tradition at Bike Shop Girl, my goal to keep you motivated and to be striving on the bike even during a hard week or long hours at work. Are you a woman that bicycles? Fill out this easy form and be part of our motivational movement!

Lezyne Micro Caddy
0

Lezyne Micro Caddy Bag Review

Saddle bags are a needed thing in my life. Something that most bike shops forget to mention when they sell you that new road or mountain bike. Riding around with out tools, tube or inflation device is like driving around in your car with out a spare tire. Yes, you can call someone if you get a flat but that isn’t the empower cycling female I hope you are! Plus, a saddle bag can hold that phone for you as well.

Most folks don’t think twice about what saddle bag to put on their bike. They look at two things. Size and color. There is more to a saddle bag than you would think.

Tech spec of the Lezyne Micro Caddy

MSRP: $24.99-19.99
Sizes: Medium (tested) and Small
Colors: Black or White

What’s Unique of the Lezyne Micro Caddy

Two things caught me as I installed the Lezyne Micro Caddy.

The first is the white color. I love all things white and so far it has stayed white which is awesome.

Lezyne Micro Caddy

The second is how the bag attached to the seat rails. It almost has wings that wrap back on itself. Making it so you don’t need a strap to secure the bag to the seat post to eliminate waggle.

Lezyne Micro Caddy

A few other cool features:
• The multi-tool holder under the bag. This allows for easy access to do quick changes on the bike.
• Reflective piping around the bag. It doesn’t replace a light but it is nice.

Overall thoughts of the Micro Caddy

The bag is nice, it holds my goods under my saddle. I like the unique features that I haven’t seen on a bag before. More and more bike shops are carrying them which is also nice so that you don’t have to buy online. Something about being able to put it on your bike to see if you like it…you can’t replace it. After about 2,000 miles on my cross bike the stitching started to blow open and the white zipper turned yellow. I haven’t tried to wash the bag in fear of the stitching getting worse, we will see if it makes it through the winter!

This product was provided to me at no charge from Lezyne. My opinion is honest and opinionated, probably why you’re still reading. I wasn’t bribed or paid for this review.



Giro LA DND Women's Glove
0

Preview: Giro LA DND Women’s Glove

There are two styles of mountain bike gloves I use. The first is your basic, light-weight, and is really there to keep your hands from slipping off your bars when they are covered with sweat, or when you slide across the hard pack dirt trails. The second type of glove I use is for longer rides, with a bit more padding in the palm and normally a size bigger for when my hands swell and my fingers “grow.”

The Giro LA DND gloves fall into the first category, with extra points for style.

Giro LA DND Women’s Gloves $26

MSRP: $26
Features:

  • Slip on design (no adjustable strap)
  • Slim fitting
  • Used on road or mtb

Full review of wear and tear in a month or so! If you are looking into buying a pair of these, support BSG by purchasing through this link at JensonUSA.

 Disclaimer: I was provided this product at no charge for review. Unfortunately, I was not paid or bribed for my opinion.

Cross of the North 2013
0

A Cyclocross Race for Last Place

When someone asks how your race went, traditionally you want to tell them your place 1st or 5th out of 10, something to that tune. When you are in last place you want to list out all the other positives of the race, this was my race this past Sunday. My first race of any discipline in Colorado, my first cyclocross race of the season, and my first race as a Category 3.

Sure, I’m looking at most of this early season’s racing as practice and learning, but it was still a pretty brutal showing on my part.

The Course at Cross of the North

I strongly believe that my carbon 29er hardtail would be been better suited for tearing up the 95% sand course that made up the Cross of the North. Up and down you went, a lot of sweeping turns that let me learn with 4 laps of racing practice, how to turn in sand (you don’t “turn”) and how to gracefully place your front wheel to force you to tumble off the bike.

I’m sure with the proper training in my legs the sand would have been easier to spin through and the necessary dismounts on two sandy hairpins would have been unnecessary, but for this race they were necessary and my legs were toast.

Cyclocross in Colorado

To be honest my biggest reason for nerves going into the race was the people, or lack there of knowing the people. Cyclocross is about the community to me. Shelling out and racing for 45 minutes is just the icing on the cake. Driving to races in the heat, cold, snow and rain is my own version of being a fan of football. Instead of being crowded around a TV or a grill at a tailgate, I’m at a cyclocross race surrounded by some of the best people I could ask for. This to me is cyclocross and I could only hope that Colorado would deliver like Maryland and North Carolina have.

Most of my teammates of Team Cycleton don’t start racing until October, so there isn’t that instant family to find when showing up in the morning but there was faces that I recognized and was greeted with warm smiles. There was the chatter before the whistle at the line and friendly talks in the parking lot with faces you don’t recognize but saw you racing and find the light in the wreckage of your failed race.

Results are in the Smiles and Miles

The race was hot, dusty and a bit shattering for me. I was happy with last place in SW3, which would have been top 10 in the SW4. I am happy that I didn’t submit a downgrade request when moving and I’m happy I showed up to race. One more step closer to making Colorado my home and to create the community I miss so badly from North Carolina.

Thank You’s

I need to thank the handful of fast dudes from Boulder Cycle Sport that were all super friendly and eased my nerves when the talked it up in the parking lot at 8am.

Thank you to Megan Hottman of The Cyclist – Lawyer as she encouraged me when passing (after flatting, getting fixed and catching me)

Chrome Camo Bag Header
0

Safety to Another Level: Chrome Reflective Camo Bags

Being seen at night is a big concern for most cyclist (yet reflectors are the first thing that come off new bikes.) Chrome is launching a limited run of Reflective Camo Bags that are made in the USA. What looks normal in the day, lights up when a car light shines on the fabric to make it easier to spot.

Limited run, available at select shops – find one near you or hit up Chrome.

 

Chasing Mailboxes
0

Motivational Monday with Mary

What is your name?

Mary Gersemalina

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

Bike touring, randonneuring, day rides, commuting, and tooling around town

What is your first cycling memory?

My first memory is being a little kid and learning to ride without training wheels. To master two-wheeled technique, I resorted to a combination of weaving and paddling circles on a little red bike in my parents garage, hidden from any potential onlookers (or, in my case, siblings) until I finally figured out the basics of two-wheeled transport.

Who inspires you to ride? Better yet, why?

My parents initially inspired me to ride, and I carry that with me today. They introduced me to the idea that my bike is a vehicle for exploration and instilled in me the importance of being active. In addition, my husband and my friends also keep me motivated. We use our bikes to meet up after work and go out for dinner. Simple things like that get me out the door. My husband, friends, and I also love spending the day together touring the countryside on bikes, whether it is a randonneuring event or just a fun century ride. When I initially began riding seriously as an adult I did most of my cycling on my own. Over time I’ve found that I like solo rides on occasion, but generally I like that my cycling has a social element to it. I’ve met some really great people through commuting, touring, and randonneuring, and it helps get me out the door when I know that I’m going to see my friends on any given ride.

What has been your best moment on the bike so far this year?

My husband and I rode a weeklong tandem bike tour that we planned and routed ourselves, averaging 85 miles per day over seven days. As part of that, we climbed Trail Ridge Road– the highest continuous paved road in the United States– on our first day. Trail Ridge tops out at over 12,000 feet. To me, that tour and that day riding up Trail Ridge, showed me how much I have grown in my confidence as well as my abilities as a cyclist as well as tandem rider. It really was a spectacular adventure. We were two little bike riders climbing big tall mountains and having the time of our lives. I wrote about it a fair amount on my blog, Chasing Mailboxes.

Tell us what you ride

I own primarily steel touring frames. As I mentioned, my husband and I have a custom tandem, a Co-Motion Java 29er that we use for touring and randonneuring as well as a Cannondale mountain tandem– which is aluminum– that we use for off-road riding. I own a Bike Friday Pocket Rocket, which is a packable flyer and ideal for something like paved light touring. My Surly Long Haul Trucker and Rivendell Quickbeam are perfect for bike commuting and grocery shopping. I use my Rivendell Romulus and Rawland Nordavinden for century rides and brevets/randonneuring events, if I’m not on the tandem. I also own a Bike Friday TIkit, which is a fast-fold bike designed for commuting and multi-modal transport. I really enjoy trying out different bikes and using them for various purposes.

*    *    *    *    *    *

Motivational Monday, a Monday tradition at Bike Shop Girl, my goal to keep you motivated and to be striving on the bike even during a hard week or long hours at work. Are you a woman that bicycles? Fill out this easy form and be part of our motivational movement! 

This Campaign has ended. No more pledges can be made.


    Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /nfs/c10/h04/mnt/150842/domains/bikeshopgirl.com/html/wp-content/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/includes/theme-stuff.php on line 122