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Princeton Tech Push Light Review

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Princeton Tech Push Light Review

Princeton Tech Push Front Light

MSRP: $49.99
Power:
100 Lumens powered by an LED
Burn Time:
63 Hours Blinking
14 Hours Low
4 Hours High

Initial Thoughts of the Push Light

I received the Princeton Tech Push light in for review last fall.  After my accident in October I wasn’t able to really test it as it should be tested in a true commuter/road aspect.  A few weeks ago I started using it as part of my daily front light for my commuter.  My first feelings of the light out of the box was superb.  Princeton Tech has great retail product package experience, and they also do a great job with the user interface of the light.  It simply works.

The light mounts to the handlebar using a rubber coated round clamp that tightens up with a plastic knob on the end of a screw/bolt style.  The light head pivots on the mount incase your bar isn’t perfectly straight.   The light easily is removed, yet is very sturdy on the handlebar thanks to the combination of the rubber and knob you can tighten down on.

Push Light Review

I chose to mount my light upside down on my bar mainly as I felt the red blinking lights that are on the side (cool feature) weren’t able to be seen if the light was mounted on the top of the bar.   Normally I also like this way as the light has less “top heavy” feel, flopping less on the bar.

Main Features of the Light

We’ve already gone over the mounting system of the light.  This works well as I have mounted the light on my mountain bike and did some easy off roading and the light did not move.  Here’s some more features that I love.

Easy to use large button function. One button, with gloves it is easy to find.

Red blinking lights on the side. This is a pretty cool feature and even able to be seen to a point during the day.  On drop bar bikes the drops hide the blinking, and if you mount the light on the top of the bar the red blinking light is towards the bottom of the light… which it was more centered on the sides.

Several light functions. The below video will give a good run through of the settings.

Overall Review of the Light

This light for $49.99 is a great deal. Aesthetically I love it, even over my normal go to Planet Bike Blaze 1W. This is mainly due to the mount feature and the clean metal/black look. The Blaze does have a better run time, but I don’t know what the Blazer provides in lumens (I haven’t been able to find on the internet..) I should also mention that more local bike shops carry Planet Bike products over Princeton Tech.  I haven’t run my Push light through a full set of new batteries, that is a set of batteries I have installed fresh instead of the ones that came in the box.  For the most part I run this light in blinking mode during my commute thanks to day light savings.

I highly recommend this light for someone that needs a reliable light source, has funny handlebars or possibly will take their rig off the beaten path.

Buy it Now

This product was given to me at no charge for review.  I was not paid or bribed to give this review and it will have my honest opinion or thoughts through out. Several of the above links are affiliate links.  I believe in this product and feel you’ll be happy if you purchase.

 

Review: Portland Design Works Aether Demon

9 PDW Aether Demon

It’s pretty apparent how I feel about bike lights and the level of safety they add to your bike rides. A blinking front and rear light are found on most of my bikes, including some of my mountain bikes if I’m going to hit the road on the way to find my dirt diet. When Emily started commuting to the hospital every morning we purchased a couple lights for her All City Nature Boy that were bright, but it became apparent that the USB front light was kicking the watch battery powered rear light’s arse. Every couple weeks the batteries needed replacing or the rear light wasn’t shining as bright as new. Make fun of me that something this small stressed me out, but at 4:30am I want her seen as much as possible.

That’s about when a little birdy told me about a new USB powered rear light coming out from PDW.

Meet the Portland Design Works Aether Demon

MSRP: $49.00

Details: 

  • Nichia™ 0.5 watt LED
  • USB charging Li-ion battery
  • Texas Instruments™ integrated circuit (I have no idea what that means)
  • 4 modes (run time): Dance (8 hrs), Breathe (8 hrs), Group Ride (175 hrs at 10% power), Rock Steady (3.5 hrs)
  • Includes seatpost, seatstay mounts

Overall Thoughts of the Aether Demon™

Sometimes, though very rarely, I review a product and all I have to say about it is “it really works.” This light is it. The short USB plug that comes with the light plugs into the bottom and then either into your computer, or I use the USB box that came with my iPhone/iPad. It blinks demon blue until it’s charged, you unplug it and go on your way. With included mounts you can install the light on your seat post or on a seat stay on the bike frame. Both mounts allow you to pivot the light to be pointed properly behind you.

Pro’s and Con’s

For $49 it’s hard to beat a USB charging rear light that last for a good long while. Especially one with a great company standing behind it. The only thing I would change has to do with the light output, I’m a big fan of the Light & Motion Vis 180 rear that has light output on the sides for cars coming towards you perpendicular. That’s really my only feedback of the light.

The mount is solid, the USB plug closes up well and the light strobing options are great. If you are in the market for a new rear light and you want something that won’t blow through batteries, take a look at this beauty from Portland Design Works.

Check them out online, or find your local bike shop that stocks them.

Disclaimer: This light was provided at no charge for review. Saying that, I would buy one full retail.

Review: Bike After Dark Fireball Mark II Wheel Light

3 Bike After Dark Fireball Mark II

This review was put in play by Luna Cycles in Lenior, NC. I am very grateful for their time and assistance, and commuter knowledge!

Visibility is the bane of cyclists everywhere. As a daily commuter, I find myself riding in the worst visibility conditions: early morning light, evening dusk, rain, fog, and nighttime darkness. I wear high-visibility yellow, I strap a riot of blinking lights to the front and back of my bike – I’d get a head-to-toe glow in the dark tattoo if I thought it would help – all in a quest to be noticed by drivers. It was with this quest in mind that I jumped at the opportunity to try out the Fireball Mark II light from Bike After Dark.

Continue reading →

Interbike ’12: Light & Motion TAZ: Ultra-Lightweight, Rechargeable, Waterproof

0 Light & Motion Taz

Keep up to date with the Bike Shop Girl coverage of the 2012 Interbike Trade Show with coverage, previews, exclusives and interviews.

TAZ was designed to be a beast on the trail with a flood beam so wide that you will be able to navigate tight switchbacks without a helmet light. By combining the brightness of a performance light with the safety features of a commuter light (such as side lights that pulse and can be manually turned off when not needed on the trail), the TAZ is the very definition of crossover, accomplishing both tasks without compromise.

Featuring three high-end CREE LEDs and a custom-designed reflector/lens system, the TAZ has two spot beams and an incredibly wide flood beam that throws out about as much light as a motorcycle headlight with a smoother beam pattern.

Whether you are swerving through the chaotic single-track of downtown traffic or shooting off onto a secret little stash of trails, the TAZ is your companion that will lead the way.

TAZ 800 $249

Light & Motion TAZ 800

Light & Motion TAZ 800

Lumens:
High- 800
Med- 400
Low- 200
Pulse- 200
Flash- 200

Run Time:

High- 2:00
Med- 4:00
Low- 8:00
Pulse- 12:00
Flash- 24:00

System Weight:
216 gr

TAZ 1200 $299

Light & Motion TAZ 1200

Light & Motion TAZ 1200

Lumens:
High- 1200
Med- 600
Low- 300
Pulse- 300
Flash- 300

Run Time:
High- 1:30
Med- 3:00
Low- 6:00
Pulse- 9:00
Flash- 18:00

System Weight:
216 gr

 

Preparing for Burn 24 (Plus a Light Promo)

2 Burn 24 Hour

Burn 24 Hour

Over the next few days I’ll be posting rambling post, maybe gear setup thoughts and simply going a bit bonkers prior to my 24 solo race next weekend at Burn 24 in Wilkesboro, NC. (Ladies sign up, I need people to ride with in the middle of the night!)

A few more last decent rides left before race day. Tonights ride will be to test out light setups, battery burn times, and night setup. I’ll have a good amount of rambling thoughts after sitting 4 hours in the dark tonight.
If you are around tonight not doing anything, come ride with me! Will be leaving the house and riding down to North Meck Park. If you need lights I got a couple extra sets for borrowing.

Speaking of Lights.. Don’t Be Left in the Dark at Burn24

Long time sponsor of the Bike Shop Girl, Light & Motion is coming back strong in 2012 and there’s no excuse for you to be left in the dark on Dark Mountain. They’re bringing the goods for you to demo and keep the aliens at bay. We will have brand new Seca 1400s ($50), Seca 800s ($45), Stella 600 Duals ($40), and Stella 300s ($40) available to rent. A killer deal will be offered for anyone who wants to ride with a helmet and bar-mounted light – $75 for the race bundle, a Seca and Stella!!! All systems come with a battery and can be used as helmet or bar mounted lights. We also have additional batteries available to rent. Our friendly staff will help outfit you with lights, label your batteries, and give you tips to ride confidently and fast at night!

 Reserve your rental by contacting Heidi at hhall@lightandmotion.com. Let her know soon. The race is next weekend and it’s a long way from CA to NC.
 Turn on the gas when the sun goes down for a chance to win your own Seca 800! The male and female with the fastest night lap will walk away with just that, a new light. If that’s not enough, pick up a coupon for 15% off your next light purchase from Light & Motion. Don’t be left in the DARK!

Knog Blinder Arrow Light Review

5 Knog Blinder Light Review

We all know my obsession for lights and bags. I have so many of both as I’m always trying to find the perfect one. Rechargeable lights are something I really love. Especially the latest push for USB rechargeable. You see, before lights and bags I am a tech freak. iPad, iMac, MacBook Air, GoPro’s, Canon cameras, iPhones, you get the idea. I always have a computer with me, so charging a light through USB is really easy for me. Much easier than finding batteries at CVS.

Meet the Knog Blinder Arrow Light $44.99

Knog Blinder Light Review

I received a front light in the mail, and it has been on the front of my bikes since February. I’ve traveled with it to Frostbike, and utilize it anytime I’m on the road. I’ve had to charge it twice, it’s bright and easy to use. The mount works on all types of handlebar styles, widths and bends. The USB is easy to use, but you have to have the right room for it. It doesn’t fit in well right between two other USB’s due to the light size.

Knog Blinder Light Review

In Knog fashion they come in many colors & styles

Long term I plan to order a rear, as making a white front light bright seems to be easier than making a red rear light bright and eye catching.

Visit Knog’s website to view all styles!

This product was provided for free for review. I was not bribed or paid for this review. 

Last Days to Win a Bike Light

3 Light & Motion Motivational Monday

Light & Motion Motivational Monday

We are in the last day of the June Light & Motion Motivational Monday light contest!

This month’s Motivational Monday posts are brought to you by one of my personal favorites, Light & Motion.  Light & Motion wants to know who or what in the cycling community motivates  you. All you have to do us leave a comment here or on Light & Motions’ Facebook page. In the next few days we’ll be choosing one lucky winner to score a brand new VIS 360 commuter light!

Introduction of the Cateye TL-LD570 Reflex Auto Light

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We recently received the Cateye TL-LD570 Reflex Auto Light and it quickly was installed on the rear of my Salsa Casseroll.  Our initial spin around the block gave the impression that this rectangle of a light is bright, and the reflector works wonderfully.  Something I didn’t realize I was missing in a light.

Continue reading →

This Little Light of Mine, Using Lights at All Times

5 Light & Motion Lights

This is a drum I have beat a decent amount in the past, but I need to beat it again as the summer days get longer and people are riding their bikes more and more. There are many reasons I believe you should have a front and rear light on blinking at all times on the bike, at the end it is safety and keeping you intact on your bike.

Reasons to Use Front and Rear Blinky Lights All The Time

  • I have been left hooked in a major intersection and fully believe a front light would have made the old man see me
  • Make yourself easier to spot
  • It makes cars more aware of you, and the space around you. In my experience with a rear blinky light it seems cars give you more space as they pass
  • Habit to turn on your lights
  • Why not??

Recommendations:

My favorite light set is the Light & Motion Urban 200 Combo Kit (support BSG and buy through that link!)

Win a Bike Light – Motivational Monday with Jill Homer

5 Interview with Jill Homer

Light & Motion Motivational MondayThis month’s Motivational Monday posts are brought to you by one of my personal favorites, Light & Motion. Between now and the end of June, Light & Motion wants to know who or what in the cycling community motivates  you. All you have to do us leave a comment here or on Light & Motions’ Facebook page. At the end of the month we’ll be choosing one lucky winner to score a brand new VIS 360 commuter light!


What’s your name and location?

Jill Homer. I currently live in Los Altos, California.

What type of cycling do you enjoy?

If I had to sum my riding up in one phrase, I would say I love “bicycle touring.” I love seeing small parts of the world from the seat of a bicycle, from the winding
singletrack in my backyard mountains to the vast frozen tundra of the Iditarod Trail. Sometimes I travel for a couple hours and sometimes for days, but always, in my mind, the emphasis is more on fun and discovery than pure training. Because of this desire to really get out there, I enjoy all types of riding — mountain biking, snow biking, and road cycling.

What is your first cycling memory?

When I was six years old I received my first “big girl” bike as a Christmas present — a yellow Huffy with a brown banana seat. It was a hand-me-down from one of my mother’s friends. I was always secretly ashamed of my yellow-and-brown bike and was jealous when, a few years later, my sister received a much prettier pink and purple Huffy. I’m not sure if not wanting to be seen on an ugly bike is solely to blame, but I didn’t ride that avidly as a child. I used my bike when I needed transportation to my friends’ houses, but didn’t often just go out for simple bike rides.

Who in the current cycling industry inspires you, and better yet WHY?

In the cycling industry, I would say the guys at Salsa Cycles inspire me — Jason Boucher, Joe Meiser, etc. Not only is their company continuously developing innovative bicycles for all types of riding, but they’re out there riding them all the time. Jason rides through the winter in Minnesota. Joe has finished the Tour Divide and Trans-Iowa. I’ve met them both — Jason is on the board at Adventure Cycling Association — and they’re just cool guys.

Interview with Jill Homer

What was your best moment on a bike in 2010?

My best bike moment came in the midst of a 140-mile gravel grinder on the Denali Highway in Alaska, called the Denali Classic. At the time I was contemplating
taking a job in Missoula, Montana (where I lived for 8 months before moving to California.) I was very apprehensive about leaving Alaska, and that long ponderous ride gave me time to really process it. Toward the end I was suffering quite a bit — it was a warm day, I was sunburnt and the rougher-than-expected gravel road had rattled my hands and back — but I crested a hill with a great view of the Susitna Valley bathed in golden evening light. A feeling of peace washed over
me and I knew moving to Montana was the right decision for me. It’s been a wild year of change ever since, but this single moment stands out as a definitive point of perspective.

In the next year, what are your goals with cycling and pushing yourself forward in 2011?

In 2011, I’ve directed more of my endurance training focus to running. Right now I’m training for the Tahoe Rim Trail 100, which will be my first 100-mile trail ultramarathon (I’ve completed one 100-mile foot race, the Susitna 100 in Alaska in February.) This requires a lot of running focus, so my main goals
right now with bicycles are to commute regularly and have fun. I work from home right now and often use my bicycles to run errands and access trails, and try to drive as little as possible. I also recently moved to California and have a couple of big goals, including a day road tour of the Santa Cruz Mountains that will likely amount to a double century with a ton of climbing, and also linking up a mostly dirt mountain bike route from my home on the east side of the mountains to the Pacific coastline.

Wanna Know About my Bikes?

I am the current owner-user of five bicycles, more than I ever expected. I have a 2010 Rocky Mountain Element, a high-end racing mountain bike; a 2008 Surly Karate Monkey, my steel-framed hardtail 29er that I rode in the Tour Divide and that is currently set up as a single-speed; a 2004 Calfee carbon road bike,
which is actually my boyfriend’s bike but I’ve largely inherited it; a 2007 Surly Pugsley, my beloved snow bike; and a fixed-gear commuting bicycle.