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Review: Abus Bordo Lite

0 Abus Boro Lite Review

As a rep with QBP we are sometimes sent fun samples to try out, if we like them we can show them to shops and increase sales a bit in that category. Earlier this year I was sent some Abus lock samples, the coolest of course was this folding, cuff like, Bordo Lite.

MSRP: $90
Details:

  • 5 mm steel bars, with plastic coating to prevent damage to the bicycle’s paintwork
  • Silicone cover for the lock body with “soft touch” properties
  • Link construction allows compact folding
  • The bars and the lock body are made of particularly light materials and ferrous alloy
  • Bars are linked with special rivets
  • Premium cylinder for high protection against manipulations, e.g. picking

Colors: Black (reviewed), red, white

As a bike commuter, and someone that likes to empower folks to use their bike everyday this lock excites me. I know, I am a nerd.

The lock is simple once you understand which way to turn the key to lock it back up. It is compact, and yet long enough to lock the front wheel. You can carry it on spare bottle cage mounts like I do, or you can use velcro and attach it to another tube of your bike and it isn’t heavy to put it in your jersey pocket if needed.

$90 is steep for a lock that isn’t a u-lock but the beefier brother to this, the Bordo 6000/90 is supposedly just as strong, especially in cold weather (retail of $129).

I don’t believe you’ll be buying this if your bike cost less than $700 or you are locking it up to run into the coffee shop. If you are design oriented, overly protective of your bike, and don’t want to carry a second lock or cable to lock your front wheel… this lock is for you. I’m completely sold on it and plan to buy one for my other commuter bike, and for both of my girlfriend’s bikes.

Learn more about the Abus Bordo Lite on their website.

Disclaimer: I wasn’t paid or bribed for this review. The product was provided no charge as a work sample.

Love Valley Roubaix – March 24th

0 Love Valley Roubaix

I’m going to call this a “gravel, road ride”

March 24, 2013
Love Valley, NC
1st Annual – 50 Miles of Sexy!

If you have never visited, Love Valley North Carolina is step back to earlier times. This quaint little western town is at the base of the Brushy Mountains and surrounded by beautiful winding dirt-packed roads.
The course is approximately 50 miles with 60% +/- packed dirt roads. Bring your CX or road bike with thick wall tires and enjoy this scenic event.

Divisions
Female
Male

Cost
Female $25 online, $30 day of
Male $35 online, $40 day of

Route
LVR Route on mapmyride.com

Mandatory Gear
Helmet, Bike

Rules / Guidelines
Ride single file to the right when on open roads unless passing
Obey all traffic rules as all roads are open to vehicular & horse traffic
Riders may support other riders
Yield to horse traffic and ask for directions from rider

Register on Bike Reg
Learn about other events held by Blue Mountain Revival 

An Introduction to the 2013 Swobo Fillmore

0 Front Full Drive Side

A guest post by Laura of Loose Nuts Cycles in Atlanta, GA

I love a good mountain bike ride, but if I can’t make it out of the city, there are few things better than cruising around town on a beautiful, warm day with a great bike underneath you.  Atlanta had it’s first glimpse of spring this past weekend.  It was sunny, almost 70 degrees, just a little breezy, and quite literally the perfect day for city cycling.  I had several errands to run and was looking forward to being out and about on a new machine.

Continue reading →

LUNA Pro Team Still has a Dominating Team

0 Luna Chix

The 2013 LUNA Pro team is keeping on with their dominating list of killer girls. What has been a long time running “winning” team will continue and I’m excited to see what these girls will do in 2013.

From Marla:

The LUNA Pro Team rolls into this New Year with the same winning world-class roster as in 2012 headlined by Olympic medalist Georgia Gould and World Cup Champion Catharine Pendrel.

ATHLETES

• Catharine Pendrel – 2011 World Champion, 2012 World Cup Champion
• Georgia Gould – Olympic bronze medalist, U.S. National MTB Champion
• Katerina Nash – Four time Olympian
• Teal Stetson Lee – Mountain bike and cyclocross pro
• Shonny Vanlandingham – 2010 XTERRA World Champion
• Danelle Kabush – 2012 XTERRA Mountain Champion
• Suzie Snyder – 2012 U.S. National XTERRA Champion

STAFF

• Dave McLaughlin – GM
• Waldek Stepniowski – Team Manager
• Marla Streb – Media and PR
• Chris Mathis – Equipment Manager
• Dusty LaBarr – Mechanic

Olympic bronze medalist Georgia Gould, current World Cup Champion Catharine Pendrel and
long-time staff members Dave, Waldek and Chris will continue with the LUNA Pro Team for four
more years.

Mountain bike legend and former XTERRA World Champion Shonny Vanlandingham, current
XTERRA Mountain Champ Danelle Kabush, US National XTERRA Champion Suzie Snyder and
Marla Streb have each extended their LUNA Pro Team contracts through 2014.

Four-time Olympian and World Cup winner Katerina Nash and development rider Teal Stetson-
Lee have each signed through 2013.

The team welcomes new mechanic Dusty LaBarr. Dusty is a veteran of the international race
circuit and brings a fresh perspective to the team.

The 2013 LUNA Pro Team is proud to announce committed support from Orbea bicycles, Fox
Racing Shox and Giro for four years. Sponsors through 2014 include Maxxis, Shimano, Squadra,
Prana and Camelbak.

Bike Shop Build: Colnago Master

0 Glory Cycles Colnago Master

The thoughts and details during a bike build are what make a great bike shop a resource and a dream factory for bicycle geeks like myself. These custom bike builds are what keep me inspired and excited to continue to work within the industry. Few more bike profiles over yonder.

Colnago Master from Glory Cycles in Greenville, SC

 

WABA’s Women & Bicycles Program

2 Women And Bicycles

WABA (Washington Area Bicycle Association) is putting together an education and outreach program to get more women on bikes! While the program is still in the infancy it seems they have obtainable goals and mission to begin with. I’m excited to follow along with what WABA is doing and how these efforts can be duplicated elsewhere.

From WABA….

Why is getting more women on bikes a critical cause?

  • In 2012, women represented just 22.7 percent of cyclists on the road in D.C. According to DDOT, that’s a slight drop since 2011.
  • In Women on Wheels, April Streeter writes, “New bike commuters are overwhelmingly male. Data reviewed by researchers John Pucher and Ralph Buehler show that almost all of the recent growth in cycling in the united states recently can be attributed to men between 25 and 64 years old. Pucher and Buehler found that cycling rates are just holding steady for women, and have fallen sharply for children.”
  • Our women’s bicycling forum identified three top barriers for getting women on bikes: safety (fear, safety concerns, inexperience/confidence, harassment), logistics (facilities, time commitment, weather, gear, money), and perception (misconceptions, double standards, and professionalism).
  • We aren’t the only group at work! Through Women Bike, the League of American Bicyclists is working at a National level to encourage women to facilitate solutions on the local level.

How is WABA going to fix these problems through the Women & Bicycles program?

  • Ten “Roll Models” will be selected to mentor women in their friend, family, church, and work groups
  • Roll Models and mentees will be invited to a series of bike meetups, group rides, and workshops that will mix practical advice and conversation about how to incorporate cycling into one’s lifestyle with socializing and low-key hanging out.
  • Non-participants will be kept abreast of the program, so they’ll learn more about the issues facing women on bikes and be inclined to encourage their friends and family to bike, regardless of gender.

We don’t want to sit around and talk about what’s discouraging women from biking, so we’ve created a program centered on peer-to-peer encouragement, information, and experience through events.

Want to learn more? Visit WABA.org

Review: Surly Merino Wool Longsleeve Jersey

2 Surly Womens Jersey

This winter I’ve had the opportunity to add pretty key pieces to my cold weather attire. With a good amount of cold base miles, I’ve shredded some items and some have stayed strong and worthy of a solid review. A few different long sleeve jerseys are my main highlights from this shredding that I’ll be reviewing this week.

There is something comforting about a soft merino wool piece of clothing. It wraps you up in it’s natural warmth, and can be reused for a couple weeks at a time if you don’t sweat it up too badly. Most folks who are purchasing their first piece of merino get sticker shock, but quickly they understand they are replacing 2-3 piece of clothing due to the wicking, warmth and longevity of wool. Ever purchased a pair of Smartwool socks? I bet you wish all of your socks were that amazing.

Features

MSRP: $140
Colors: Black or Gray

There are a handful of features that Surly will want to tell you about, but the best feature for me is the ability to wear this on and off the bike easily. The jersey turns into a sweater when paired with a pair of jeans. The sleeves with thumb holes are long enough and easily flipped up for casual use. The back has a “cigarette pocket” which is one pocket with zippers on either side.

Surly Womens Merino Wool

Fit

Traditionally women’s wool jerseys have fit pretty baggy and boxy on me. I can say that this jersey in size large fits me pretty darn well. With room for a tshirt or jersey underneath it isn’t super snug but it does allow me to feel like a woman when wearing it. As I mentioned I often wear it into shops as a sweater and it does look like a women’s sweater (with a sweet pocket in the back!)

Overall Thoughts

If you can swallow the price tag of $140 this jersey will last you many seasons, keeping you warm and dry. It’s an essential for me when traveling as I can wear it a handful of times and not be overwhelmed by stench or dirt.

See it on SurlyBikes.com

Photo Credit: Benjamin Wilson